My Treasured Objects

/My Treasured Objects
My Treasured Objects2020-06-22T10:50:38+01:00

My Treasured Objects

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object. We will be sharing ours too!

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media. To get the ball rolling we have some of Galway City Museum’s staff member’s picks.

Enjoy – Bain sult as

#MyTreasuredObject

Thank you to Caoimhe Ni Chiardha who sent us her treasured object.

“Truthfully I don’t know much about this religious medal or what is represents.  Only that it belonged to Daideo who passed away six weeks after I came into the world.  Mamó gave it to me shortly before she left us some 20 years later. I was close with Mamó and she seemed to think I was wonderful which always baffled me a bit at that time!  I remember feeling elated that she trusted me to have it.  Daideo left a big hole by all accounts and I am still sad that I didn’t get the chance to remember him.  For the next decade it came with me everywhere.  It was pocketed for every exam, test and job interview.  I spent some time abroad and naturally packed it up with the rest of the essentials.  I had many a sweaty search for it in my stuffed backpack.  The horrible feeling of dread pouring over me at the thought that I had misplaced it followed by a jolt of relief and delight once I finally got my hands on my prize.  Always tucking it back into a safe place where I was sure I would find it quickly again.  It was the only truly irreplaceable item I carried with me while I was away from home.My Mamó and Daideo still come into my head a lot especially now that my parents have inherited those titles.  I don’t rely on it so much these days and I might not think about it for months on end.  When I do I have to drop everything and run to make sure it is still safe.  It is the only real treasure in my jewelry box.”

#gcmonline #galwaycity #galwaycitymuseum #museumonline #museumfromhome #treasuredobject
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#MyTreasuredObject
Thank you to Christina Dowell for commenting on Facebook about her fabulous print. "This Georgian print, which belonged to my 4x great grandmother, Harriot Burke, daughter of James Burke of Danesfield in Moycullen. It was one of the few things my 2x great grandmother brought with her when she emigrated to Canada in 1908, and has now been in my family for eight generations. I believe it tells a story of the Ribbonmen, a group that agitated for Catholic land ownership rights & were transported to Australia for it" 

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does
it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object.

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media. To get the ball rolling we have some Galway City Museum staff member’s picks already posted online.

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

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#MyTreasuredObject 
Helen Bermingham, Collections Officer, Galway City Museum
My ‘treasured object’ is my Grandmother Ellen Connaughton’s wedding ring. Ellen married Thomas Bermingham, my grandfather, on 24 January 1929 in Mountbellew Church, Co. Galway.  Born 3 January 1900, Ellen passed away in 1983 – a lifetime which saw many significant events including the First World War, 1916 Rising, War of Independence, Civil War and World War 2.  In April 1923 shortly before the end of the Civil War, Thomas her husband-to-be was one of three neighbours in the locality taken from their homes early one morning by armed and masked men. While Thomas was released later that day, one of the men was shot and killed. At the inquest into the killing, the Coroner stated the circumstances of the tragedy were cowardly and that ‘It was up to every Irishman to put down such crimes as these and to give any information possible of the perpetrator of those crimes.’
Ellen’s wedding ring is one of the few mementos we have of her – especially poignant as I was quite young when she died and remember very little about her. We do not know when or where the ring was purchased and we know nothing about their wedding day.  Rings have been used as love tokens and to symbolise marriage since Roman times. As with all gold and silver pieces, the ring is hallmarked on the inside.  The Dublin Assay Office was established in 1637 to assay and hallmark all items of gold and silver manufactured in Ireland. In 1638 a date letter system was introduced (continued below).

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does
it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object.

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

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#MyTreasuredObject

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would
grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you?

Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object. We will be sharing ours too!

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media. Some Galway City Museum staff member’s picks have
already been posted - have a look! www.galwaycitymuseum.ie

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

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#MyTreasuredObject

Eithne Verling – Museum Director
Landscape – Barr A Doire, An Ceathrú Rua, Co Na Gaillimhe. – This is a painting done by my father, Walter Verling, a landscape painter, in about 1972. When I was a small child we moved from Youghal in County Cork to Carraroe. Both my father and mother began teaching in the local comprehensive school – one teaching art, the other music – and we children learned Irish, went to school and enjoyed a carefree existence. The move to Carraroe was inspired in part by my father’s friendship with the great Co. Down/Connemara painter Charles Lamb. Lamb moved to Carraroe with his wife, Catherine, one of the first two female veterinarian’s to qualify from UCD and the daughter of the English novelist, Ford Maddox Ford, in 1922 and lived there until his death in 1964.

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does
it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object.

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media.

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

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#MyTreasuredObject
Thank you to Álainn Donnelly-Larkin, age 5 who sent in a photgraph of her treasured object. She also wrote us a little story.

MIA & LOTTIE "Lottie is the horse; Mia is the human.  And Mia found Lottie at a railway station, she was neighing loudly, she was stuck to a rope, and Mia unlocked the rope and she sat on the horse and said “giddy-up” and the horse ran back to our house and they both lived happily ever after. (Actually) I got the unicorn at winter solstice and I got Mia at winter solstice too, but they were both in different packets.  They don’t go together.
They are my favourite dolls, Mia and Lottie, because they’re so beautiful.  But Mia is my most favourite, because she works on the farm and stuff, and I like her clothes and her beautiful long hair and how it’s so black, and I like her jeans and her tshirt and her coat and her welly boots.
All done.  Thank you very much for reading. "

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does
it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object.

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media.

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

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#MyTreasuredObject

Karen & Kathy Cawley
Brampton, Ontario
Canada "Our most prized possession is a 17th century needlepoint picture we refer to as the Blind Harper which has been passed down through our family, originating in Ireland.  It is approximately 19” L by 15” W. without the frame. The original plain brown frame lies beneath this more decorative one.  This beautiful picture must have been painstakingly created by my ancestor as there are 144 stitches per inch. 
I have just found some paperwork referring to some of its history.  The Blind Harper referred to in these documents is named Torlough O’Carolan. When I started looking into him, I came across the Galway City Museum post about harpist Sorcha McCague’s Celebration of Torlough O’Carolan. 
It would be great if anyone out there could tell us if this is what Torlough looked like in old age and who the girl might be?  We would love to get any information that we can about this work of art"

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does
it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you? Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object.

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media. To get the ball rolling we have some Galway City Museum staff member’s picks already posted online.

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

14 0

#MyTreasuredObject

What is YOUR most treasured object? Think of the first thing you would
grab and save in an emergency. What is its background story, who does it remind you of, what feelings or memories does it evoke, and what does it say about you?

Galway City Museum would love to hear from you about your most treasured object. We will be sharing ours too!

Please send a photograph and your story to museum@galwaycity.ie with
the heading #mytreasuredobject

A selection will be posted on our website and social media. Some Galway City Museum staff member’s picks have
already been posted - have a look! www.galwaycitymuseum.ie

#mytreasuredobject #galway #galwaycitymuseum #museumfromhome
#inthistogether #personaltreasures #objectswithmeaning #virtualmuseum
#museum
...

10 0

Brendan Mc Gowan – Education Officer

In April 1968, my Mayo grandparents, who had been working in Leeds for two decades, took over the licence for the Regent Hotel in an Irish area of that city. As they had no experience working behind a bar or managing a business of that nature, it was a big risk, but the pub soon drew large crowds and became a sort of mecca for Irish musicians.

Soon after, my uncle commissioned a backdrop for the stage from a craft artist in Tynagh, Co. Galway. Measuring 180cm x 90cm, it is a rural scene made of felt and woven materials. It was collected from Tynagh and returned to Leeds, via Mayo, strapped to the roof of a rental car. Over the next decade, traditional Irish musicians from all over Ireland and England shared tunes under the scene.

My grandparents retired home to Mayo in April 1978 and the framed scene came with them. It was mounted inside the front door of their new home, over the telephone. It was gifted to me in April 2018, fifty years to the month after it was commissioned. I had it reframed and it now takes pride of place inside the front door of my Galway home.

Jackie Uí Chionna

My treasured object is a Singer sewing machine. My great-grandmother, grandmother and mother were all dressmakers, so the machine had seen a lot of use before I inherited it! Founded in 1851, The Singer Corporation was the largest manufacturer of sewing machines in the world. Each machine carried a serial number indicating its place and year of manufacture. This machine was manufactured in Kilbowie, Scotland in 1933, one of 50,000 machines produced by the factory that year. Still in full working order, I used it to make the curtains for my home in Galway when I moved here in 1992.

Harriet Dundon – Marine Institute Graduate Intern in Marine Science Communication

This painting was by my great grandfather Eric Rosewarne. He was a customs and excise officer in the 1920’s and 30’s at Holyhead Port, Wales. He used to see the Irish mail boats coming into port and leaving for Dublin.

He took up painting when he retired and most of his pictures had a nautical theme. This painting of the RMS Hibernia was completed in 1974. It shows the ship coming into the breakwater at Holyhead, circa 1938 and is remarkably accurate in the detail. I love the painting itself, which was always on display in my grandparents’ house and also the information that he typed out and put on the back of it.  To me it symbolises the connection between the east coast of Ireland where I was born and grew up and north Wales where there is strong family history and where I went to university. It is a route that I have taken by boat many, many times.

Harriet Dundon
Harriet Dundon

Eithne Verling – Museum Director

Landscape – Barr A Doire, An Ceathrú Rua, Co Na Gaillimhe. – This is a painting done by my father, Walter Verling, a landscape painter, in about 1972. When I was a small child we moved from Youghal in County Cork to Carraroe. Both my father and mother began teaching in the local comprehensive school – one teaching art, the other music – and we children learned Irish, went to school and enjoyed a carefree existence. The move to Carraroe was inspired in part by my father’s friendship with the great Co. Down/Connemara painter Charles Lamb. Lamb moved to Carraroe with his wife, Catherine, one of the first two female veterinarian’s to qualify from UCD and the daughter of the English novelist, Ford Maddox Ford, in 1922 and lived there until his death in 1964.

Eithne Verling
Eoin O’Neill – Collections Officer

Eoin O’Neill – Collections Officer

My favourite object is my passport. It has allowed me to travel all over the world from America to Asia, from Europe to Australia and to experience new people, food, music and much more. I have been able to visit friends and family all over the world because of it. It has contributed to my love of history by allowing me to travel and see amazing historical and cultural sites the world over. It has also given me the opportunity to understand and learn more about peoples and cultures much different than my own all around the world. Owning an Irish passport makes travelling anywhere in the world a very positive experience and I consider myself very fortunate to have been able to afford and allowed to travel wherever I’ve liked. Hopefully when this crisis of Covid-19 is over I can get back to my love of travelling again.

Damien Donnellan – Education and Exhibitions

This book is called ‘Between Ourselves’, it is the 7th Volume of the internal staff magazine that was produced by Cόmhlucht Siύicre Eireann Teo, otherwise known as the Irish Sugar Company.

My uncle Christie Donnellan gave me this book while I was doing research for my college dissertation on the Tuam Sugar Factory. My uncle trained and worked as an electrician with the Irish Sugar Company in its Tuam Factory. Christie, along with my father and a number of uncles and aunts all worked in the factory in various roles at various times. The factory was an important feature of life in the town for such a long time.

Researching the Tuam factory allowed me to spend time with and find out more about the lives of my family and for that reason it is one of my treasured objects.

Damien Donnellan
Damien Donnellan

MUSEUM OPENING TIMES

Galway City Museum is open Tuesday to Saturday on four daily timeslots; 10am, 11:30am, 2:00pm and 3:30pm.  Admission remains FREE but visitors will now require a ticket for their visit. Tickets can be booked online by visiting galwaycitymuseum.ie and will need to be presented either in printed format or on mobile phones at the main entrance to the museum.  In light of Covid-19 the number of visitors will be strictly controlled and those attending will have to adhere to correct social distancing and health and safety protocols so that everyone can enjoy the exhibitions in a safe and comfortable environment.

For any further information contact museum@galwaycity.ie or phone +353 (0)91 532 460. 
 
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