The Wild Atlantic Sea Science

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The Wild Atlantic SeaScience

This exhibition will take you from the rocky shore to the ocean depths, and help you find out more about the wonders of our marine world; from about how the moon affects the tides and the global movement of ocean currents, to who eats whom in the ocean depths, and what it’s really like to explore our oceans. The exhibition builds on the Sea Science exhibition developed by staff and researchers at the Ryan Institute in the National University of Ireland, Galway. Commissioned in 2016 by the Marine Institute for the national maritime festival, SeaFest, the Wild Atlantic is an exhibition designed to increase public awareness and understanding of our marine environment. The Ryan Institute is the National University of Ireland, Galway’s hub for Environmental, Marine and Energy research. The Marine Institute is the State agency with responsibility for marine research and development in Ireland.

Mapping The Ocean

The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest of the 5 oceans on Earth.
It runs the length of the planet, with Europe and Africa on its eastern border, and North and South America on its western border. The Atlantic Ocean first appeared, in full, on maps around 1507, and we have continued to explore it since then. In May 2013, an agreement, called the Galway Statement, was made between the European Union, Canada, the Unites States, and partner countries, to work together conducting research into the Atlantic Ocean. This Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA), of which the Marine Institute is a partner, is an international group, who have five main areas for investigation:

1. Ecosystem approaches to ocean health and stressors
2. Observing systems3. Aquaculture
4. Ocean literacy – engaging with society
5. Seabed and benthic habitat mapping

The group are currently working on mapping the North Atlantic, and by the end of 2016, there were 4 mapping surveys covering large paths across the seafloor in the North Atlantic.

1851

By the 1850’s there was much activity, trade and communication between Europe and north America. With the invention of the electric telegraph, message delivery time was reduced to hours. The first commercially successful, submarine telegraph cable was laid between England and France in 1851. However, the first truly successful transatlantic cable was laid in 1865 by the Atlantic Telegraph Company.

2015

In June 2015, the Marine Institute’s research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer, mapped a wide swath of the seabed in international waters between Galway and St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. Their survey recorded physical seabed characteristics, such as water depth, hardness and roughness of the seafloor, and the presence of geohazards, in addition to discovering a mountain range higher than Carrauntoohil.

July 2015

In July 2015, the Canadian Coast Guard vessel, the CCG Louis St. Laurent, surveyed a swath of seabed in international waters between Halifax, Nova Scotia and TromsØ in Norway. Using multibeam sonar technology, they mapped the seabed and recorded other data, such as temperature and salinity, to help better understand this area of the North Atlantic. They also discovered underwater volcanoes and seamounts “new” to us.

February 2016

In February 2016, the French research vessel, L’Atalante, surveyed another swath of the Atlantic, this time in international waters between Pointe-á-Pitre in Guadeloupe and Ponta Delgada in the Azores. They surveyed an area close to the mid-Atlantic ridge, which is the largest mountain range on the planet, despite being under water.

May 2016

In May 2016, the Marine Institute’s research vessel, the Celtic Explorer, mapped another huge section of Atlantic seabed in international waters between Galway and St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. The total area surveyed was over 12,000 square kilometres. In addition to mapping previously unknown territory, the team also further investigated discoveries made during their previous expedition.

Mapping The Ocean

The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest of the 5 oceans on Earth.
It runs the length of the planet, with Europe and Africa on its eastern border, and North and South America on its western border. The Atlantic Ocean first appeared, in full, on maps around 1507, and we have continued to explore it since then. In May 2013, an agreement, called the Galway Statement, was made between the European Union, Canada, the Unites States, and partner countries, to work together conducting research into the Atlantic Ocean. This Atlantic Ocean Research Alliance (AORA), of which the Marine Institute is a partner, is an international group, who have five main areas for investigation:

1. Ecosystem approaches to ocean health and stressors
2. Observing systems3. Aquaculture
4. Ocean literacy – engaging with society
5. Seabed and benthic habitat mapping

The group are currently working on mapping the North Atlantic, and by the end of 2016, there were 4 mapping surveys covering large paths across the seafloor in the North Atlantic.

1851

By the 1850’s there was much activity, trade and communication between Europe and north America. With the invention of the electric telegraph, message delivery time was reduced to hours. The first commercially successful, submarine telegraph cable was laid between England and France in 1851. However, the first truly successful transatlantic cable was laid in 1865 by the Atlantic Telegraph Company.

2015

In June 2015, the Marine Institute’s research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer, mapped a wide swath of the seabed in international waters between Galway and St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. Their survey recorded physical seabed characteristics, such as water depth, hardness and roughness of the seafloor, and the presence of geohazards, in addition to discovering a mountain range higher than Carrauntoohil.

July 2015

In July 2015, the Canadian Coast Guard vessel, the CCG Louis St. Laurent, surveyed a swath of seabed in international waters between Halifax, Nova Scotia and TromsØ in Norway. Using multibeam sonar technology, they mapped the seabed and recorded other data, such as temperature and salinity, to help better understand this area of the North Atlantic. They also discovered underwater volcanoes and seamounts “new” to us.

February 2016

In February 2016, the French research vessel, L’Atalante, surveyed another swath of the Atlantic, this time in international waters between Pointe-á-Pitre in Guadeloupe and Ponta Delgada in the Azores. They surveyed an area close to the mid-Atlantic ridge, which is the largest mountain range on the planet, despite being under water.

May 2016

In May 2016, the Marine Institute’s research vessel, the Celtic Explorer, mapped another huge section of Atlantic seabed in international waters between Galway and St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. The total area surveyed was over 12,000 square kilometres. In addition to mapping previously unknown territory, the team also further investigated discoveries made during their previous expedition.


MUSEUM OPENING TIMES
Galway City Museum opens Tuesday to Saturday from 10am until 5pm.  Admission is FREE!
N.B. NO BOOKING REQUIRED

 
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